My retirement experience

by Fern Phillips
(Cochrane, Alberta, Canada)

First, I felt forced out. I retired early because I could and also because of a deteriorating work environment and my health was bothering me. I didn't have any 'glory days' to finish out my work, but I had enjoyed the 'bleeding edge' technology experience.


I moved to an acreage and within a year I lost my husband to an accident. He was 63. I found that my retirement dreams died with him. In hindsight I should have planned for something like that.

Finally I sold the acreage because I found I hated the house. I had made a big mistake in buying it, as it had no privacy and poor neighbours. I bought a bachelor-style house back closer to my small family and after a year got a little rescue dog. Those were good decisions.

With the dream of land, I've hoped to 'fail harder'. So learn from my mistakes and learn to cope alone, and make new dreams.

Meantime my mom and brother died and my reasons for being here went away! Also the area is now busy and noisy, where it was quiet when I first bought it. I hate the thought of moving again besides do I move to someplace private or someplace where if I get sick I have protection?

I did some estate planning and decided to help out my granddaughter with her college fees as a result. I think that was a good decision, I feel good about it even though it didn't improve our relationship or bring us closer.

I feel good about my volunteer work but sometimes the conflicts exhaust me and I want to be away from it. I still get sick a lot and find that when I go out I get sick, when I stay home I tend to be healthier.

I have been disappointed that my art and writing have not found a market, and the effort seems more than I am willing to do when it comes to marketing. I found a few things I enjoy doing, so those motivate me, such as a facebook page to show my art, a brainstorming group on facebook, a blog, and joining Artella to share ideas with other artists.

I especially enjoy continuing with my computer work, such as family tree research, photoshop, digital art, fiction writing and facebook games. I am so glad I kept up my computer skills over the years and into my retirement, it is one way to safely stay connected.

I'd love to be a mentor for the new face of aging!

Comments for My retirement experience

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To answer your kind questions
by: Fern

My facebook link
https://www.facebook.com/fernp3

and some art at PFern
which should be searchable.

Nope, I'm not the gorgeous blond, its hard to search on facebook.

also my webpage
www.pfern.org


Where are you?
by: Helen UK

Tried to find you on fb and got this gorgeous blond babe ! Is this you ? Hahahah

Productive Aging
by: Anonymous

Fern,

I think that your doing retirement the right way. By that I mean your good at practicing new techniques for self-discovery even in the sad situation where your husband passed away. Your also asking to be a mentor for seniors. I've spent the past 10 years or so on helping the 50+demographic work on self-discovery techniques and productive aging.

On my website I have a link to the social media of Facebook, Twitter & LinkedIn.
http://www.seniorpreneur.ca/

Joe W.


Art
by: Susan, California

When I read sbout your art, I was hooked. Where can we see it?

also... your financial help for college...it hasn't improved your relationship, but perhaps it will. Finishing college makes a huge difference in someone's life, and that can improve the lives of teir family down generations.

As the first person in our family to get a college degree, I was struck by the radiating effects of that accomplishment. It broke a cycle that had been in place for many generations, and will continue to have major effects .

For my daughter, college is just what one does, it's not a climb, it's a path. Sooo...

I've rattled on like this to say: You have done a wonderful thing! I hope that down the line you will experience a closer relationship.

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