Working Through Early Disability Retirement

by Bob MCDavies
(Arizona)

My story isn't typical.


I was forced to retire due to disability, which I won't go into much detail over, but didn't plan to retire at the age that I ended up doing so.

I wanted to retire at the age of 65, which I believe most people consider an appropriate age.

I believe that there are many Americans who have faced, will face, and are facing similar circumstances that I have went through.

Fortunately, my wife, who has held a professional job during much of her life aside from a few years spent raising our children, was still employed during this time.

I received standard benefits for a short while but mostly spent my days at home trying to contemplate if I would really be done with my working career. I actually enjoyed working, and enjoyed my job, and did not realize how much happiness it gave me until about a couple of months into being at home.

Days seemed to last much longer, and my wife seemed to get home later and later each night. It's been almost a year now, and I've learned some things along the way.

Although I'm still receiving disability benefits, I have yet to tap into any retirement savings, which I am thankful for. Insurance is covering most of my medical costs, and we all know co-pays are far less of a pain if we didn't have those large, overpaid companies assisting us.

My wife and I have considered moving into a smaller home, but have no immediate plans to do so.

If I was able to have known beforehand what would have happened, I definitely would have prepared of list of activities or places to visit. I generally spend my days now working on creating wood crafts, and have just discovered the benefits of looking up some of my old favorites on Youtube.

In summation, if you are fortunate enough to plan out your retirement, think it through. Not only with yourself, but with your loved ones as well.

If you're facing a position like I have, realize that sometimes leaving the game before the final buzzer sounds is a lot better than losing.

Wendy: Just had to bold the wise words above... so true! Disability retirements are so difficult for the retiree to wrap their brain around. It's difficult enough for most retirees, but with medical issues on top of it, and no real decision making process -- it's a tough road.

I've seen so many disabilities spend their life energies going to work, dragging themselves into work, instead of allowing the body to repair itself.

You are finding yourself.. who knows, maybe you should start a blog (better yet a website for income) and make your own YouTube videos to teach wood working to beginners!

p.s. Your story is perfectly typical for disability retirements.. totally unexpected retirement!

Best Wishes! Wendy

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